Food Contamination

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Food Contamination Free

By EdApp
4 Lessons
4.2
(5 reviews)

Learn about safe food handling and cleaning procedures for a commercial kitchen.

Food Contamination Lessons

Click through the microlessons below to preview this course. Each lesson is designed to deliver engaging and effective learning to your team in only minutes.

  1. Introduction to Food Contamination
  2. Cleaning Procedures
  3. Cross Contamination
  4. Cross-Contamination: Allergens

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Food Contamination course excerpts

Introduction to Food Contamination

Learn about the different types of food contaminants and the best practices for personal and kitchen hygiene.
Food Contamination Course - Lesson Excerpt

Physical Contamination Physical objects that are common sources of physical contamination include: hair, pests, dirt, fingernails, glass, metal or plastic shards

Introduction to Food Contamination

Chemical Contamination Chemicals can get into food through improper storage of chemicals, unwashed fruits and vegetables, non food safe containers and pest control products.

Introduction to Food Contamination

Biological Contamination Chemicals can get into food by improper storage of chemicals, unwashed fruits and vegetables, non food safe containers, pest control products.

Introduction to Food Contamination

Allergen Contamination Some food ingredients or their components can cause life threatening allergic reactions.

Introduction to Food Contamination

A chefs hat or hair net should always be worn and long hair needs to be tied back. Facial hair should be covered with a beard net. Fully covered non-slip shoes must be worn for your safety.

Introduction to Food Contamination

A clean uniform must be worn everyday and only put on at work. A different apron should be worn at different stations.

Introduction to Food Contamination

Gloves should be worn at all times. It's important to change them when handling different raw and cooked food groups. Keep your finger nails short and clean.

Introduction to Food Contamination

Accessories such as earrings, necklaces and watches are not permitted. Always take these off and place them in your locker before starting your shift.

Introduction to Food Contamination

Food Temperature Control It's important to keep food stored at the right temperatures to prevent it from spoiling and making customers sick.

Introduction to Food Contamination

Potentially hazardous foods include raw and cooked meats, dairy products and processed foods containing eggs, beans and nuts, seafood, processed fruits and salads, cooked rice and pasta.

Introduction to Food Contamination

Cleaning Procedures

Learn how to reduce and/or eliminate microbiological, physical and chemical contaminants in the kitchen.
Food Contamination Course - Lesson Excerpt

Cleaning Procedures This lesson covers the best practices for reducing and/or eliminating, microbiological, physical and chemical contaminants in the kitchen.

Cleaning Procedures

How effective are sanitisers over time? Select all that apply

Cross Contamination

Understand why it's important to prevent cross-contamination and common strategies used in a commercial kitchen.
Food Contamination Course - Lesson Excerpt

Cross Contamination Cross contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to foods from other foods, and food preparation surfaces and utensils.

Cross Contamination

Raw meat, poultry and seafood should always be stored in containers or sealed bags to prevent the juices, which contain harmful bacteria, from dripping onto other food, in the fridge.

Cross Contamination

Never use the same food surface (e.g bowls and chopping boards) to prepare or store raw meat and cooked meat.

Cross Contamination

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Cross Contamination

Cross-Contamination: Allergens

Worldwide there's been a rise in the prevalence of food allergies. Learn about the strategies we use to protect customers from coming into contact with food allergens.
Food Contamination Course - Lesson Excerpt

Allergens Allergens, even at trace amounts can potentially be life-threatening. The most common allergens are: peanuts tree nuts milk eggs sesame seeds fish shellfish soy gluten celery mustard sulphites lupin This lesson will cover the strategies we've implemented to prevent allergenic cross contamination.

Consult the customer about suitable food preparation methods. e.g laying foil across the grill before cooking the steak

Cross-Contamination: Allergens

A designated meal-preparation area is set aside. It's cleaned and sanitised after each use.

Cross-Contamination: Allergens

Only clean and sanitised utensils are used when storing, preparing or serving an allergen-free meal

Cross-Contamination: Allergens

Don't reuse equipment for different ingredients e.g Don't reuse the same pasta pot for cooking gluten-free noodles

Cross-Contamination: Allergens

Check the food labels of all the products and we check with suppliers when products are reformulated or changed to verify that the new recipes don't introduce an allergen.

Cross-Contamination: Allergens

Food Contamination Course Author

EdAppEdApp is an award winning, mobile first microlearning platform with integrated authoring and delivery. EdApp contributes training courses that have been created by the in house instructional design specialists.

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