DC4 2020

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DC4 2020

Double Click 4 using flipped classroom methodology.

DC4 2020 course content

Lesson 1

In this lesson, you will learn new vocabulary about types of houses, parts of the house, furniture and appliances.
Lesson Excerpts

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

TYPES OF HOUSES

A building divided into flats sharing the same front door.

Which one is a Farmhouse? Yes!

Lesson 1

Which one is a Farmhouse? Yes!

Lesson 1

Which one is a Farmhouse? Yes!

Lesson 1

PARTS OF THE HOUSE

HOME APPLIANCES

LET'S PRACTICE!

WE'RE DONE! YOU HAVE FINISHED LESSON 1!

Lesson 2

IN THIS LESSON, YOU WILL LEARN VOCABULARY RELATED TO: -COMMON HOUSE PROBLEMS -HOW TO TALK TO A REAL STATE AGENT WHEN YOU WANT TO RENT/SELL A HOUSE/APARTMENT.
Lesson Excerpts

IT'S TIME FOR LESSON 2!

WHEN WE LIVE IN A HOUSE/APARTMENT, THERE ARE A SERIES OF PROBLEMS THAT WE MIGHT ENCOUNTER. LET'S REVIEW SOME OF THEM.

DRIPPING FAUCET

Lesson 2

SQUEAKING DOOR

Lesson 2

FALLING ROOF TILES

Lesson 2

Improper Electrical Wiring

Lesson 2

ROOF LEAKAGE

Lesson 2

PLUMBING DEFECTS/OLD PIPING MATERIAL

Lesson 2

Poor Drainage

Lesson 2

Sticking Drawers

Lesson 2

Cracks in the Walls

Lesson 2

Low Water Pressure in the Shower

Lesson 2

CLOGGED DRAIN

Lesson 2

CLOGGED DRAIN

Lesson 2

CONTINUE TO THE NEXT SLIDE, SO YOU CAN SEE HOW A REAL STATE AGENT AD LOOKS LIKE AND COMPLETE THE MISSING WORDS

Lesson 2

RENTING AN APARTMENT

RENTING AN APARTMENT

LET US KNOW YOUR OPINION ON THE NEXT SLIDE. TAKE YOUR TIME TO VISUALIZE THIS IMAGE, SINCE YOU WON'T BE ABLE TO RETURN TO IT.

Lesson 2

CONGRATULATIONS!

Lesson 3

THIS LESSON WILL ACTUALLY BE A REMINDER FOR YOU, ABOUT DAILY ROUTINES AND EVERYDAY ACTIVITIES
Lesson Excerpts

HI! WE'RE GLAD TO KNOW THAT YOU'RE COMMITTED TO LEARNING ENGLISH

NOW, TO PUT THOSE CONCEPTS INTO PERSPECTIVE, LET'S PRACTICE A BIT

WELL DONE! I BET YOU DID REMEMBER EVERYTHING ABOUT DAILY ROUTINE ACTIVITIES

Lesson 4

Adjectives are words that describe nouns or pronouns. Adverbs are words that modify everything but nouns and pronouns.
Lesson Excerpts

ADJECTIVES

ADVERBS

ADVERBS OF TIME

It'll stop raining soon, so let's wait until _______.

Which is correct? Jenny isn't here _______. Can I take a message?

Christmas is celebrated _______ on December 25.

Harry's never used a gun _______, so he couldn't be the killer.

An adverb of time tells us when or _______ the action occurs.

Lesson 5

IN THIS LESSON YOU REVIEW YOUR KNOWLEDGE IN PRESENT TENSES and STATIVE VERBS
Lesson Excerpts

WELCOME TO LESSON 5!

LET'S SEE IT ONE BY ONE!

SIMPLE PRESENT

LET'S PRACTICE NOW!

PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

LET'S PRACTICE NOW!

PRESENT PERFECT

LET'S PRACTICE NOW!

PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

LET'S PRACTICE NOW!

STATIVE VERBS

LET'S PRACTICE NOW!

Lesson 6

IN THIS LESSON YOU WILL: -Understand phrasal verbs and how to use them -Learn about phrasal verb Break (in, down, off, others) -Learn about phrasal verb Build (on, up, others)
Lesson Excerpts

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

IN THIS LESSON YOU WILL: - Learn and understand what a proverb is. - Learn and understand what a saying is. - Learn and understand what a quote is. - Learn and understand what an idiom or idiomatic expression is. - Learn about common house idiomatic expressions.
Lesson Excerpts

Lesson 7

A proverb A simple and short saying, widely known, often metaphorical, which expresses a basic truth or practical precept, based on common sense or cultural experience. Example: Honesty is the best policy. Example: "All that glitters is not gold" - (this means that just because something looks good, does not necessarily mean that it is good.)

Lesson 7

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Lesson 7

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Lesson 7

Wao! So inspiring.

Lesson 8

IN THIS LESSON YOU WILL: - Learn about advance reading structures - Learn and use key word transformation
Lesson Excerpts

Lesson 8

Did you get it right?

Key Word Transformation Select all that apply

Lesson 1

Learn about vacations and vocabulary related to it.
Lesson Excerpts

WELCOME TO UNIT 2!

IN THIS LESSON, WE'LL ATTACK THE MAIN VOCABULARY PART OF THE UNIT

AS YOU MAY KNOW, WE CAN HAVE MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF VACATIONS

CAMPING TRIP

Lesson 1

CRUISE

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SKIING VACATION

Lesson 1

CYCLING VACATION

Lesson 1

BEACH VACATION

Lesson 1

CROSS-COUNTRY ROAD TRIP

Lesson 1

BACKPACKING VACATION

Lesson 1

SIGHTSEEING VACATION

Lesson 1

LET'S SEE HOW CAN WE DESCRIBE THE BEACH

DIRTY BEACH

Lesson 1

SANDY BEACH

Lesson 1

CROWDED BEACH

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SECLUDED BEACH

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TROPICAL BEACH

Lesson 1

AND THIS IS HOW CAN WE DESCRIBE THE STREETS

COBBLED STREET (COBBLED IS THE MATERIAL USED ON THE STREET)

Lesson 1

NARROW STREETS

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BUSY STREETS (WHEN LOTS OF PEOPLE WALK ON IT)

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WINDING STREETS ( WHEN THE STREET IS NOT STRAIGHT AND BENDS A LOT. E.g. LOMBARD STREET, IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA)

Lesson 1

CROWDED STREETS

Lesson 1

AND THE FOOD...

LOCAL FOOD

Lesson 1

GOURMET FOOD

Lesson 1

DELICIOUS/TASTY FOOD

Lesson 1

ALSO FOR THE MOUNTAINS

ROCKY MOUNTAINS (MOSTLY MADE OF ROCKS)

Lesson 1

STEEP MOUNTAINS (THESE ARE MOUNTAINS THAT HAVE A VERY SHARP ANGLE)

Lesson 1

HIGH MOUNTAINS, SUCH AS MOUNT EVEREST

Lesson 1

SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS ( SNOW IS COVERING THE TOP OF THEM)

Lesson 1

YOUR DOING GREAT! KEEP IT UP!

Lesson 1

TOURIST ATTRACTIONS

ANCIENT CITIES, SUCH AS MACHU PICCHU IN PERU.

Lesson 1

ANCIENT RUINS,SUCH AS THE ACROPOLIS, IN GREECE

Lesson 1

HORSEMANSHIP

Lesson 1

LEAP OFF CLIFFS

Lesson 1

LONG SHORELINES

Lesson 1

LUKEWARM WATERS, WHICH IS WATER THAT IS NOT COLD NOR HOT.

Lesson 1

QUAINT VILLAGES, WHICH ARE ATTRACTIVELY UNUSUAL OR OLD FASHIONED VILLAGES.

Lesson 1

SWAMPS

Lesson 1

UNSPOILED COASTLINES, WHICH MEANS THAT THIS COAST IS INTACT.

Lesson 1

STROLL ALONG THE PROMENADE = WALK ALONG THE COASTLINE

Lesson 1

AND THEN, IF WE WANT TO USE THOSE MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION, WE MUST BUY A TICKET!

NOW THAT WE BOUGHT OUR TICKET, WE MUST DECIDE ON OUR ACCOMMODATION

HOTELS

Lesson 1

AIRBNB

Lesson 1

B&B (BED AND BREAKFAST, WHICH IS KIND OF A HOTEL, ONLY WITH BREAKFAST INCLUDED)

Lesson 1

CAMPING ( TO SLEEP IN A TENT)

Lesson 1

MOTEL

Lesson 1

VILLA

Lesson 1

LET'S MAKE OUR RESERVATION!

LET'S REVIEW THOSE CONCEPTS

Lesson 2

In this lesson students will be able to use: - Will - Be going to - Simple Present - Present Progressive - Future progressive
Lesson Excerpts

FUTURE TENSES

** FUTURE TENSE: WILL **

**DO YOU KNOW HOW DO WE FORM SIMPLE FUTURE SENTENCES? **

LET'S PRACTICE!

FUTURE TENSE: BE GOING TO

Answer the questions within the next video. You may number the answers after each video

FUTURE TENSE: PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

LET'S PRACTICE!

LET'S NOW SEE THIS THREE IN CONTEXT....

FUTURE TENSE: SIMPLE PRESENT

FUTURE TENSES: FUTURE PROGRESSIVE

WHAT ARE THE USES OF FUTURE PROGRESSIVE?

HOW DO WE FORM FUTURE PROGRESSIVE?

LET'S NOW WATCH A VIDEO EXPLANATION...

LET'S NOW PRACTICE!

LET'S PRACTICE WHAT WE'VE LEARNED IN THIS LESSON!

Lesson 3

Identify clauses Identify time clauses
Lesson Excerpts

USING TIME CLAUSES TO TALK ABOUT THE FUTURE

FIRST THING FIRST!

BUT....

DIQUE' YOU UNDERSTAND!

NOW...

FUTURE TIME CLAUSES

HOW DO WE USE THEM?

LET'S NOW WATCH THIS VIDEO EXPLANATION...

LET'S NOW PRACTICE!

Lesson 4

-Learn about conditionals type 0 -Learn about conditionals type 1
Lesson Excerpts

IN THIS LESSON WE WILL TALK ABOUT CONDITIONALS TYPE 0 AND 1

ZERO CONDITIONAL

FUNCTIONS OF THE ZERO CONDITIONAL

NOW...

LET'S NOW SEE IT CONTEXT...

I KNOW YOU DON'T LIKE BUT...

Is this a zero conditional sentence? If I call you, you come

Is this a zero conditional sentence? When it rains, the grass gets wet.

Is this a zero conditional sentence? The grass gets wet if it rains.

Is this a zero conditional sentence? If you don't find me home, I'll be at the corner store.

Is this a zero conditional sentence? If you heat ice, it melts.

CONDITIONAL TYPE 1

FUNCTIONS OF THE FIRST CONDITIONAL

NOW...

LET'S NOW SEE IT CONTEXT...

YOU GOT THIS, SO...

LET'S DO THIS ONCE AGAIN..

Lesson 5

In this lesson you will be able to: - Demonstrate understanding on the definite article “the”.
Lesson Excerpts

THE DEFINITE ARTICLE

AND HOW DO WE USE IT?

GENERAL RULES Use "the" to refer to something which has already been mentioned. EXAMPLES: On Monday, an unarmed man stole $1,000 from the bank. The thief hasn't been caught yet. Use "the" when you assume there is just one of something in that place, even if it has not been mentioned before. EXAMPLES: We went on a walk in the forest yesterday. Where is the bathroom? Use "the" in sentences or clauses where you define or identify a particular person or object. EXAMPLES: The man who wrote this book is famous. I scratched the red car parked outside. Use "the" to refer to people or objects that are unique. EXAMPLES: The sun rose at 6:17 this morning. You can go anywhere in the world. Use "the" before superlatives and ordinal numbers. EXAMPLES: This is the highest building in New York. She read the last chapter of her new book first. Use "the" with adjectives, to refer to a whole group of people. EXAMPLES: The French enjoy cheese. The elderly require special attention. Use "the" with decades. EXAMPLES: He was born in the seventies. This is a painting from the 1820's. Use "the" with clauses introduced by only EXAMPLES: This is the only day we've had sunshine all week. You are the only person he will listen to. Use "the" with names of geographical areas, rivers, mountain ranges, groups of islands, canals, and oceans. EXAMPLES: They are travelling in the Arctic. Our ship crossed the Atlantic in 7 days. Use "the" with countries that have plural names EXAMPLES: I have never been to the Netherlands. Do you know anyone who lives in the Philippines? Use "the" with countries that include the words "republic", "kingdom", or "states" in their names. EXAMPLES: She is visiting the United States. James is from the Republic of Ireland. Use "the" with newspaper names. EXAMPLES: I read it in the Guardian. She works for the New York Times. Use "the" with the names of famous buildings, works of art, museums, or monuments. EXAMPLES: Have you been to the Vietnam Memorial? We went to the Louvre and saw the Mona Lisa. Use the with the names of hotels & restaurants, unless these are named after a person. EXAMPLES: They are staying at the Hilton on 6th street. We ate at the Golden Lion. Use the with the names of families, but not with the names of individuals. EXAMPLES: We're having dinner with the Smiths tonight. The Browns are going to the play with us.

Let's practice some now!

Did you know you can pronounce this word two different ways?

Lesson 6

Learn phrasal verbs with the verbs check and call. Learn new idiomatic expressions.
Lesson Excerpts

Welcome to lesson 6!

Let's CHECK this OUT

Let's now talk about Idiomatic expressions. Remember that... an idiom is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g. over the moon, see the light ). For example: hit the sack (go to sleep) Let me hit the sack now

Lesson 7

IN THIS LESSON YOU WILL: - Learn about key word transformation - Learn word formation - Learn how to join sentences using with, when, where, which, etc. - Learn how to form collocations
Lesson Excerpts

Welcome to the end of UNIT 2.

Let's get started

KWT Show me more Key Word Transformation In this unit you've learnt things about future, idioms about weather, phrasal verbs with call and check. Your TARGET language to transform sentences using KEY WORD TRANSFORMATION should be following one of those things or the vocabulary on it (see Quizlet for more info) Let's see it in context Imaging the given sentence is: It is my plan to become a doctor after the pandemic is over. The given word is BE The new incomplete sentence is: I ________ doctor when the pandemic is over. Following the steps: 1- Confirm what is similar and cut it off. 2- Validate key word. 3- Understand the context. 4- Apply the missing sentence (3 to 6 words including the key word). 5- Recheck if everything is fine. ORIGINAL It is my plan to become a doctor after the pandemic is over. KEY WORD BE NEW SENTENCE I ________ doctor after the pandemic is over. I have: doctor after the pandemic is over. The given word BE can be used to represent MY PLAN using BE GOING TO as you use that grammar to talk about plans. Then become turns into BE as this verb is used for professions (ex. I AM a teacher). Being that said, my new sentence will be: Are you ready? Are you really ready? Okay, I trust you. Here we go: The new sentence: I am going to be a doctor after the pandemic is over. Did you get it right?

Word Formation There are four main kinds of word formation: prefixes, suffixes, conversion and compounds. Prefixes We add prefixes before the base or stem of a word. examples monorail, monolingual | mono- means ‘one’ multipurpose, multicultural | multi- means ‘many’ post-war, postgraduate | post- means ‘after’ unusual, undemocratic | un- means ‘not’ or ‘opposite to’ Suffixes We add suffixes after the base or stem of a word. The main purpose of a suffix is to show what class of word it is (e.g. noun or adjective). examples terrorism, sexism | -ism and -dom are used to form nouns employer, actor | -er and -or are used to form nouns to describe people who do things widen, simplify | -en and -ify are used to form verbs reasonable, unprofitable | -able is used to form adjectives unhappily, naturally | -ly is a common suffix used to form adverbs Conversion Conversion involves the change of a word from one word class to another. For example, the verbs to email and to microwave are formed from the nouns _email _and microwave. Can you text her? (verb from noun text, meaning to send a text-message) They are always jetting somewhere. (verb from noun jet) If you’re not careful, some downloads can damage your computer. (noun from verb download) OK, so the meeting’s on Tuesday. That’s a definite. (noun from adjective) It’s a very big if and I’m not at all sure we can afford it. (noun from conjunction, meaning ‘it’s not at all certain’) All companies have their ups and downs. (nouns from prepositions) We also use conversion when we change a proper noun into a common noun: Has anybody seen my Dickens? (copy of a book by Dickens) Compounding When we use compounding, we link together two or more bases to create a new word. Normally, the first item identifies a key feature of the second word. For example, the two bases back and ache can combine to form the compound noun backache , and the two bases post and card combine to form the compound noun postcard. Compounds are found in all word classes. The most common types of compounds are: Nouns: car park, rock band Adjectives: heartbreaking, sugar-free, airsick Verbs: oven-bake, baby-sit, chain-smoke Adverbs: good-naturedly, nevertheless It is sometimes difficult to know where to put hyphens in words that are compound ed. It is also difficult to know whether to separate words (e.g. post box) or to join the words (e.g. postbox). In such cases, it is best to check in a good learner’s dictionary. We form blends when we combine parts of existing words to form a new word: blog: blend of web and log motel: blend of motor and hotel smog: blend of smoke and fog Almost any noun may potentially combine with any other noun to form new noun compounds (e.g. computer virus, carbon footprint, quality time).

Let's work with the following now

Let's end by talking about COLLOCATIONS What is a collocation? A collocation is two or more words that often go together. These combinations just sound "right" to native English speakers, who use them all the time. On the other hand, other combinations may be unnatural and just sound "wrong". Look at these examples: natural English... unnatural English the fast train... NOT the quick train fast food... NOT quick food a quick shower.... NOT a fast shower a quick meal... NOT a fast meal Why learn collocations? Your language will be more natural and more easily understood. You will have alternative and richer ways of expressing yourself. It is easier for our brains to remember and use language in chunks or blocks rather than as single words. How to learn collocations Be aware of collocations, and try to recognize them when you see or hear them. Treat collocations as single blocks of language. Think of them as individual blocks or chunks, and learn strongly support , not strongly + support. When you learn a new word, write down other words that collocate with it (5_remember rightly, remember distinctly, remember vaguely, remember vividly_). Read as much as possible. Reading is an excellent way to learn vocabulary and collocations in context and naturally. Revise what you learn regularly. Practice using new collocations in context as soon as possible after learning them. Learn collocations in groups that work for you. You could learn them by topic (time, number, weather, money, family) or by a particular word (take action, take a chance, take an exam). Types of collocation There are several different types of collocation made from combinations of verb, noun, adjective etc. Some of the most common types are: adverb + adjective: completely satisfied (NOT downright satisfied) adjective + noun: excruciating pain (NOT excruciating joy) noun + noun: a surge of anger (NOT a rush of anger) noun + verb: lions roar (NOT lions shout) verb + noun: commit suicide (NOT undertake suicide) verb + expression with preposition: burst into tears (NOT blow up in tears) verb + adverb: wave frantically (NOT wave feverishly)

Lesson 1

Learn how to describe people's appearance Learn how to describe people's character
Lesson Excerpts

WELCOME TO UNIT 3

LESSON 1

PEOPLE'S APPEARANCE

AGE

YOUNG

Lesson 1

MIDDLE-AGED

Lesson 1

OLD

Lesson 1

BUILD

THIN

Lesson 1

SLIM

Lesson 1

WELL-BUILT

Lesson 1

PLUMP

Lesson 1

FAT

Lesson 1

HEIGHT

SHORT (CHIMBALA IS SHORT)

Lesson 1

MEDIUM HEIGHT (EL MAYOR IS MEDIUM HEIGHT)

Lesson 1

TALL

Lesson 1

HAIR

Lesson 1

FACE

Lesson 1

EYES

Lesson 1

REMEMBER THAT WE DON'T USE THE COLOR BLACK TO DESCRIBE EYES

BLACK EYE

Lesson 1

NOSE

Lesson 1

EARS

Lesson 1

MOUTH

Lesson 1

Lesson 1

NOW THAT WE HAVE DESCRIBED THE APPEARANCE, WE'RE GOING TO DESCRIBE THE PERSONALITY

CHARACTER TRAITS

Lesson 2

In this lesson, we're going to review the feelings. You must watch the entire video. It has excellent examples about all the feelings.
Lesson Excerpts

HEY THERE! WELCOME TO LESSON 2

Lesson 3

- Learn about life stages.
Lesson Excerpts

HEEEY, WHAT'S NEW?

WE'RE GOING TO TALK ABOUT A SIMPLE, SHORT TOPIC

THE STAGES OF LIFE

Lesson 3

AND, ACCORDING TO THOSE STAGES, PEOPLE NORMALLY DO CERTAIN ACTIVITIES OR PROCESSES IN LIFE, THAT ARE REGULAR OR COMMON FOR MOST OF THE PEOPLE

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

In this lesson you will be able to: - Review past tenses (simple past, past progressive, past perfect, past perfect progressive)
Lesson Excerpts

IN THIS LESSON WE WILL REVIEW PAST TENSES. THESE INCLUDE:

SIMPLE PAST

HOW DO WE FORM SIMPLE PAST SENTENCES?

BUT...

LET'S SEE THIS IN CONTEXT THEN...

Which of these are simple past sentences? Select all that apply

Which of these are simple past sentences? Select all that apply

Which of these are simple past sentences? Select all that apply

Which of these are simple past sentences? Select all that apply

Which of these are simple past sentences? Select all that apply

PAST PROGRESSIVE

HOW DO WE FORM PAST PROGRESSIVE SENTENCES?

LET'S SEE IT IN CONTEXT...

PAST PERFECT

IT CAN ALSO BE BACKWARDS..

NOW! HOW DO WE FORM PAST PERFECT SENTENCES?

SOME CONTEXT?

PAST PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

SO, HOW DO WE FORM PAST PERFECT SENTENCES?

LET'S PRACTICE THEN!

BUT LIFE IS NO THAT EASY...

Lesson 5

In this lesson you will be able to: - Use "used to" to talk about past habits - Use would to talk about past routines
Lesson Excerpts

USED TO VS WOULD

When we talk about things in the past that are not true anymore, we can do it in different ways...

Used to

Would

HOW DO WE FORM THIS SENTENCES?

LET'S NOW SEE SOME CONTEXT..

LET'S PRACTICE SOME MORE...

Lesson 6

In this lesson you will: - Learn about phrasal verbs CARRY and BRING - Learn about body Idioms
Lesson Excerpts

Let's master this now

Let's now talk about Idiomatic expressions (reviewing...) Remember that... an idiom is a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g. over the moon, see the light ). For example: Break a leg (Good luck) I know you are a great artist. Break a leg in your performance tonight!

Body parts: EYES

Lesson 6

Body parts: HEAD

Lesson 6

Body parts: EARS

Lesson 6

Body parts: NOSE

Lesson 6

Body parts: HANDS

Lesson 6

Body parts: FINGER

Lesson 6

Lesson 6

Lesson 6

You can follow this account for more idiomatic expressions.

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

- Learn about Key Word Transformation - Learn about error correction
Lesson Excerpts

Coming to and end for UNIT 3!

KWT Show me more Key Word Transformation In this unit you've learnt things about future, idioms about weather, phrasal verbs with call and check. Your TARGET language to transform sentences using KEY WORD TRANSFORMATION should be following one of those things or the vocabulary on it (see Quizlet for more info) Let's see it in context Imaging the given sentence is: How long has it been since you started working here? The given word is AGO The new incomplete sentence is: How ________ working here? Following the steps: 1- Confirm what is similar and cut it off. 2- Validate key word. 3- Understand the context. 4- Apply the missing sentence (3 to 6 words including the key word). 5- Recheck if everything is fine. ORIGINAL How long has it been since you started working here? KEY WORD AGO NEW SENTENCE How ________ working here? I have: How; working here. The given word AGO can be used to substitute SINCE and change PRESENT PERFECT into PAST SIMPLE the right auxiliary. Meaning I will substitute has it been for did. I don't have LONG; STARTED. Then STARTED becomes START as I will use SIMPLE PAST. Being that said, my new sentence will be: Are you ready? Are you really ready? Okay, I trust you. Here we go: The new sentence: How long ago did you start working here?* Did you get it right?

ERROR CORRECTION

U4-LESSON 1

Learn vocabulary about health problems. Learn about different type of doctors.
Lesson Excerpts

HI THERE! WELCOME TO UNIT 4! WE'RE ALMOST AT THE MIDDLE OF THE CYCLE

LET'S WATCH SOME ILLUSTRATIVE VIDEOS ABOUT HEALTH PROBLEMS

BESIDES THOSE, WE CAN MENTION A FEW MORE...

BAD ACNE

U4-LESSON 1

U4-LESSON 1

U4-LESSON 1

HAY FEVER OR ALLERGIC RHINITIS, IT'S AN ALLERGIC RESPONSE THAT CAUSES ITCHY WATERY EYES AND SNEEZING

U4-LESSON 1

NOSEBLEED

U4-LESSON 1

SPRAINED ANKLE

U4-LESSON 1

STIFF NECK

U4-LESSON 1

SUNBURN

U4-LESSON 1

NOW THAT WE HAVE SEEN ALL THOSE HEALTH PROBLEMS, I BELIEVE WE CAN INFER WHICH DOCTORS TO VISIT, DEPENDING ON THE PROBLEM, RIGHT?

NOW, LETS ORGANIZE THIS CONVERSATION!

U4-LESSON 2

Learn how to give advice. Learn about common symptoms.
Lesson Excerpts

U4-LESSON 2

U4-LESSON 2

LET'S PRACTICE SOME OF THAT

IF YOU HAVE A SUNBURN...

I HAVE A HAY FEVER...

I CAN'T BREATHE WELL, I HAVE A NOSEBLEED :(

OMG! I THINK I HAVE SPRAINED MY ANKLE!

I CAN'T SPEAK VERY WELL, I HAVE A SORE THROAT, IT HURTS VERY MUCH

THE MEDICINE CABINET... WHAT'S IN IT?

U4-LESSON 2

A THERMOMETER

U4-LESSON 2

COTTON BALLS

U4-LESSON 2

BANDAGES

U4-LESSON 2

BAND-AIDS

U4-LESSON 2

EYE DROPS

U4-LESSON 2

PILLS

U4-LESSON 2

OINTMENT

U4-LESSON 2

INHALER

U4-LESSON 2

NOW, ON THE OTHER HAND...

FIRST AID KIT... WHAT'S IN IT?

U4-LESSON 2

BASICALLY EVERYTHING THAT YOU HAVE IN THE MEDICINE CABINET, BUT IN A SMALLER SCALE. THE FIRST AID KIT WILL BE YOUR TRAVEL KIT TO HANDLE ANY MINOR EMERGENCY YOU COULD POSSIBLY HAVE OUTDOORS.

U4-LESSON 2

U4-LESSON 3

Learn about present and past participles
Lesson Excerpts

HI PAL! IN THIS LESSON YOU'LL KNOW WHAT ARE THE PRESENT AND PAST PARTICIPLES, AND IN WHICH SPECIFIC OCCASIONS WE CAN USE THEM.

LET'S PRACTICE A BIT.

WAY TO GO! YOU ROCK! LET'S KEEP PRACTICING!

U4-LESSON 4

Learn how to make speculations in the present and the past.
Lesson Excerpts

HELLO EVERYBODY!

LET'S SEE HOW TO TO SPECULATE AND MAKE ASSUMPTIONS IN THE PRESENT FORM

NOW THAT YOU HAVE SEEN THE EXAMPLE, LET'S GET INTO CONTEXT

LET'S PRACTICE A BIT.

WHAT IS YOUR ASSUMPTION ABOUT THIS IMAGE? CLICK OK TO TELL US.

U4-LESSON 4

WHAT CAN YOU DEDUCT FROM THIS IMAGE? CLICK OK TO TELL US.

U4-LESSON 4

WHAT CAN YOU ASSUME FROM THIS IMAGE? CLICK OK TO TELL US.

U4-LESSON 4

NOW, LET'S GO FOR THE SPECULATIONS IN THE PAST.

LET'S LOOK AT SOME ANIMATED EXAMPLES

U4-LESSON 4

U4-LESSON 4

U4-LESSON 4

U4-LESSON 4

U4-LESSON 4

U4-LESSON 4

LET'S PRACTICE !

U4-LESSON 4

WHAT CAN YOU ASSUME ABOUT THIS IMAGE?

U4-LESSON 4

WHAT CAN YOU DEDUCT FROM THIS IMAGE?

U4-LESSON 4

WHAT CAN YOU DEDUCT FROM THIS IMAGE?

U4-LESSON 4

U4- LESSON 5

In this lesson you will be able to: - Use PRESENT MODALS: OBLIGATION, NECESSITY, PROHIBITION, SUGGESTIONS.
Lesson Excerpts

MODAL VERBS

WHAT ARE MODAL VERBS?

LET'S NOW TALK ABOUT MODAL VERBS OF OBLIGATION

FIRM OBLIGATION

MUST

HAVE TO

RECOMMENDATION OR MORAL OBLIGATION

SHOULD

OUGHT TO

WE CAN ALSO HAVE MODAL VERBS OF NECESSITY

MUST

HAVE GOT

HAVE TO

WE CAN HAVE AS WELL, MODAL VERBS OF PROHIBITION

CAN'T

MAY NOT

MUST NOT

WE CAN HAVE MODAL VERBS OF SUGGESTION

MIGHT

SHOULD

COULD

SHALL

REMEMBER!

LET'S NOW PRACTICE!

U4-LESSON 6

In this lesson you will be able to: - Use PRESENT MODALS: ABILITY, POSSIBILITY, PERMISSION, REQUEST
Lesson Excerpts

MODAL VERBS

WHAT ARE MODAL VERBS?

LET'S NOW TALK ABOUT MODAL VERBS OF PERMISSION

MAY

COULD

CAN

LET'S NOW TALK ABOUT MODAL VERBS OF REQUEST

CAN AND COULD

WOULD

WE CAN ALSO HAVE MODAL VERBS OF ABILITY

WE CAN HAVE AS WELL, MODAL VERBS OF POSSIBILITY

MAY

MIGHT

COULD

MUST

HAVE TO

REMEMBER!

LET'S NOW PRACTICE!

U4-LESSON 7

In this lesson students will be able to: - Express your preferences with "would rather" and "prefer"
Lesson Excerpts

EXPRESSING PREFERENCES

LET'S NOW SEE SOME CONTEXT...

ONCE MORE!

LET'S SEE HOW THIS WORKS NOW!

WOULD RATHER

WOULD RATHER THAN

WOULD RATHER OR

WOULD RATHER SOMEONE DO

Would rather someone do Would rather is also used to express what one person prefers another person would do. The structure is similar to the unreal conditional because it expresses an imaginary wish. However, the form is also used to ask a polite question **S + would rather + Person + past verb ** EXAMPLES: Tom would rather Mary bought an SUV. Would you rather she stayed here with us? Positive Subject + would rather ('d rather) + object + past tense I would rather my son worked in finance. Susan would rather Peter took a plane. Question Would + subject + rather + object + past tense Would you rather her sister flew home tomorrow? Would you rather he came with us to the meeting?

WOULD PREFER

EXPRESSING PREFERENCES WITH PREFER

U4-LESSON 8

In this lesson students will be able to: - Understand the past and perfect modals
Lesson Excerpts

In this lesson students will be able to:

PAST & PERFECT MODALS

BUT...

Each of these modals has a slightly different meaning...

Listen to this song by Adele

BUT WAIT!

LET'S MOVE ON TO...

Listen to this song by Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Finally, let’s look at should have.

READY TO CRY?

LET'S NOW PRACTICE!

U4-LESSON 9

In this lesson students will be able to: - Use tag questions to require confirmation to statements
Lesson Excerpts

WE HAVE ALL WATCHED THIS SCENE, HAVEN'T WE?

Take a look at the sentence back there...

TODAY WE WILL TALK ABOUT...

U4-LESSON 10

In this lesson you will: - Learn about phrasal verbs COME and DIE
Lesson Excerpts

Hey there! Excited to come across this content

Phrasal Verbs Come Let's see the ones within the unit 4 Come Into (come into something) if you come into something, it becomes yours when someone dies He’s just come into some money. When my grandma died, I came into 500 thousand pesos. Come Down With (come down with something) to become ill with a particular disease, usually one that is not serious. She has come down with the flu. Try not to come down with COVID-19 because there is no cure yet. Come Across (come across someone/something) to meet someone, or to find something by chance. I came across a word I’d never seen before. She was sitting at the park when she came across Shakira. Have you ever come across such a horrible person in all your life?

Die out To become weaker or less common and then disappear completely The tribe’s traditional way of life is dying out.

U4-LESSON 10

Die down If something dies down, it becomes much less noisy, powerful, or active. I waited for the laughter to die down before I spoke. The wind died down during the night.

U4-LESSON 10

U4-LESSON 11

In this lesson you will: - Learn about health idioms - Learn about word formation
Lesson Excerpts

This is the end of unit 4! Yay!

Please, show me some review teacher!

KWT Show me more Key Word Transformation In this unit you've learnt things about future, idioms about weather, phrasal verbs with call and check. Your TARGET language to transform sentences using KEY WORD TRANSFORMATION should be following one of those things or the vocabulary on it (see Quizlet for more info) Let's see it in context Imaging the given sentence is: How long has it been since you started working here? The given word is AGO The new incomplete sentence is: How ________ working here? Following the steps: 1- Confirm what is similar and cut it off. 2- Validate key word. 3- Understand the context. 4- Apply the missing sentence (3 to 6 words including the key word). 5- Recheck if everything is fine. ORIGINAL How long has it been since you started working here? KEY WORD AGO NEW SENTENCE How ________ working here? I have: How; working here. The given word AGO can be used to substitute SINCE and change PRESENT PERFECT into PAST SIMPLE the right auxiliary. Meaning I will substitute has it been for did. I don't have LONG; STARTED. Then STARTED becomes START as I will use SIMPLE PAST. Being that said, my new sentence will be: Are you ready? Are you really ready? Okay, I trust you. Here we go: The new sentence: How long ago did you start working here?* Did you get it right?

U4-LESSON 11

U4-LESSON 11

U5-LESSON 1

-Learn about environmental problems -Learn about solutions to those problems
Lesson Excerpts

NOW, LET'S WATCH A VIDEO TO REMEMBER ALL THOSE CONCEPTS THAT WE HAVE ALREADY SEEN

LET'S JUST RECAP...

WHAT'S THE NAME OF THE POLLUTION THAT IS IN THE AIR?

LET'S NOW SEE SOME OTHER VOCABULARY CONCEPTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

Overhunting is an activity which results in serious reduction of species population or harm to wildlife.

U5-LESSON 1

SEWAGE : Waste water and excrement.

U5-LESSON 1

INDUSTRIAL WASTE

U5-LESSON 1

Overfishing is the removal of a species of fish from a body of water at a rate that the species cannot replenish, resulting in those species becoming underpopulated in that area.

U5-LESSON 1

EXHAUST FUMES : Gases ejected from an engine as waste products.

U5-LESSON 1

LET'S PUT THAT IN CONTEXT IN OUR COUNTRY

AT WHAT TIME IN SANTO DOMINGO CAN YOU SEE THE WORST EXHAUST FUME SCENARIO? (CONSIDERING OUR CURRENT CURFEW SITUATION?

IN WHICH CASE DO YOU REMEMBER THAT WE HAD THE BIGGEST SMOG SITUATION AROUND THE ENTIRE CITY OF SANTO DOMINGO?

NOW THAT YOU KNOW ALL THESE ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES WE HAVE, WE WANT TO DISCUSS ABOUT THE THINGS THAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP OR PREVENT THESE SITUATIONS, BY REVIEWING THE USEFUL PHRASES WHEN GIVING SUGGESTIONS.

LET'S SEE SOME ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS AND ITS SOLUTIONS

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM : DEFORESTATION

U5-LESSON 1

SOLUTION: PLANT TREES

U5-LESSON 1

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM : WASTE DISPOSAL

U5-LESSON 1

SOLUTION: RECYCLE

U5-LESSON 1

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM : EXHAUST FUMES IN TRAFFIC

U5-LESSON 1

SOLUTION: CARPOOL (Carpooling is the sharing of car journeys so that more than one person travels in a car, and prevents the need for others to have to drive to a location themselves)

U5-LESSON 1

U5-LESSON 2

Learn about animals and their vocabulary
Lesson Excerpts

HI THERE! IN THIS LESSON, WE'LL TALK ABOUT ANIMALS AND ENDANGERED SPECIES.

U5-LESSON 2

LET'S TAKE A LOOK INTO THE NEXT ARTICLE TO SEE MORE DETAILS AND EXAMPLES.

NEVERTHELESS, IN THE ANIMAL KINGDOM THERE ARE SOME ANIMALS THAT ARE IN DANGER, FOR MANY DIFFERENT CAUSES

An ENDANGERED SPECIES is a species that is very likely to become extinct in the near future, either worldwide or in a particular political jurisdiction.

U5-LESSON 2

ENDANGERED SPECIES may be at risk due to factors such as habitat loss, is the process by which a natural habitat becomes incapable of supporting its native species.

U5-LESSON 2

ENDANGERED SPECIES RISK FACTOR #2 Poaching, has been defined as the illegal hunting or capturing of wild animals.

U5-LESSON 2

ENDANGERED SPECIES RISK FACTOR #3 INVASIVE SPECIES is a non-native species that spreads from the point of introduction and becomes abundant.

U5-LESSON 2

WE EVEN HAVE AN ENDANGERED SPECIES DAY

U5-LESSON 2

NEXT, YOU CAN FIND A LIST OF THE TOP 10 ENDANGERED SPECIES AS OF 2020.

U5-LESSON 3

Learn how to ask for an opinion.
Lesson Excerpts

IN THIS LESSON, YOU'LL LEARN HOW TO ASK & GIVE YOUR OPINION

U5-LESSON 3

LET'S SEE HOW IT GOES IN REAL LIFE SITUATIONS

LET'S PRACTICE A BIT...

U5- LESSON 4

In this lesson students will be able to: - Identify comparative and superlative forms
Lesson Excerpts

COMPARATIVE FORMS

ADJECTIVES

ADVERBS

COMPARATIVES

SUPERLATIVES

EXAMPLES: I earn a great deal more now than I did ten years ago. This is easily the best film I've ever seen I'm way better than you at English. You're nowhere near as good as me at English. The city is **much the same as it was 20 years ago. He's just about the nicest person I know. I see loads morere people than I used to.

AS AND LIKE

U5- LESSON 5

IN THIS LESSON STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO: - USE TOO AND ENOUGH AS COMPARATIVE FORMS
Lesson Excerpts

IN THIS LESSON YOU WILL BE ABLE TO:

TOO

Too is used to mean MORE THAN SUFFICIENT or MORE/LESS THAN NECESSARY. It’s too late to stop him. Jerry was too young to watch the movie There are too many people on this train, there’s nowhere to sit. You have too much money, give some to me. You’ve eaten too many of those cakes.

ENOUGH

Enough is used to mean SUFFICIENT Your clothes are **big enough **to fit me You’ve done enough work. You can stop now. Have you got enough money to buy me a drink? Enough is used in negative sentences to mean less than sufficient or less than necessary. You’re not working fast enough, you won’t finish on time. Sorry, I haven’t got **enough food **for everyone. Not enough of my friends are coming to the party.

LET'S NOW WATCH SOME CONTEXT...

U5-LESSON 6 PART 1

IN THIS LESSON STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO: - IDENTIFY GERUND AND INFINITIVES USES
Lesson Excerpts

GERUNDS AND INFINITIVES

An INFINITIVE is the "to" form of the verb. You can also use an infinitive as the subject, the complement, or the object of a sentence. EXAMPLES: **To learn **is important. (subject of sentence) The most important thing is to learn. (complement of sentence) He wants to learn. (object of sentence)

U5-LESSON 6 PART 2

IN THIS LESSON STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO: - IDENTIFY GERUND AND INFINITIVES USES
Lesson Excerpts

GERUNDS AND INFINITIVES

Some verbs are followed by a NOUN + INFINITIVE.

LET'S NOW...

I can't stand ............ all the time.

Our teacher won't allow ............ dictionaries during the test.

We advised .............. a taxi instead of walking to the restaurant.

The city doesn't allow ............ along curbs painted red.

John is never on time to work! I hate ............ late every day.

He needs to get a visa extension immediately. The authorities won't permit ........... in the country without a visa.

U5 - LESSON 6 PART 3

Take a look at some exceptions and advance topics
Lesson Excerpts

GERUNDS AND INFINITIVES

Some verbs can be followed by a GERUND or an INFINITIVE, but with a difference in meaning and be totally DIFFERENT... EXAMPLES: Nancy remembered getting married. (Nancy has a memory of getting married.) Fred remembered to bring sunblock to the beach. (Fred remembered that he needed to bring sunblock.) YOU CAN FIND THE FULL LIST OF VERBS HERE: https://www.englishpage.com/gerunds/gerund_or_infinitive_different_list.htm

Verbs which indicate location can often be followed by "ING" forms. This pattern is: VERB OF LOCATION + LOCATION + VERB+ING. EXAMPLES: Sarah stood at the corner waiting for Tom. Melissa lay in bed thinking about her future. Don clung to the side of the cliff looking down. YOU CAN FIND THE FULL LIST OF VERBS HERE: https://www.englishpage.com/gerunds/verb_location_ing.htm

U5-LESSON 7

In this lesson you will: - Learn phrasal verbs with DRAW and DO. - Learn about Idioms and fixed phrases related to animals. - Learn about key word transformations
Lesson Excerpts

Hey there! Are you an eager beaver?

Phrasal Verbs DO Let's see the ones within the unit 5 Do with have (something/anything) to do with be something/anything/nothing to do with I’m quite sure Nancy’s resignation has nothing to do with her health. I could do with a nice cup of tea right now. Do without (do without someone/something) to succeed in living or working without someone or something. There’s no more milk, so I guess we’ll just have to do without. You’ll be gone for six days? I think we can do without you for that long. Do over (do something over) ​to do something again from the beginning, especially because you did it badly the first time OK, we’ll do it over, but try to sing the right words this time. Those exercises are not quite good. Please do them over one more time.

Phrasal Verbs DO Let's see the ones within the unit 5 Draw back to move away from someone/something She drew back in horror. He is really afraid of spiders. He will draw back if he sees one. Draw on draw on or draw upon to use something that you have gradually gained or saved As an actor, you often draw on your own life experiences. Your body draws on its reserves of fat during the times when you are fasting. Draw up to prepare and write something such as a document or plan Guidelines have been drawn up for dealing with emergencies. The government drew back a plan to fight COVID-19. Draw into to arrive in/into a place (usually trains) The train drew into the station.

The next slide will contain an embed link and you need to use the same credentials you used when you took the listening quiz inside it*

Let's continue with the following

Please, show me some review teacher!

KWT Show me more Key Word Transformation In this unit you've learnt things about future, idioms about weather, phrasal verbs with call and check. Your TARGET language to transform sentences using KEY WORD TRANSFORMATION should be following one of those things or the vocabulary on it (see Quizlet for more info) Let's see it in context Imaging the given sentence is: How long has it been since you started working here? The given word is AGO The new incomplete sentence is: How ________ working here? Following the steps: 1- Confirm what is similar and cut it off. 2- Validate key word. 3- Understand the context. 4- Apply the missing sentence (3 to 6 words including the key word). 5- Recheck if everything is fine. ORIGINAL How long has it been since you started working here? KEY WORD AGO NEW SENTENCE How ________ working here? I have: How; working here. The given word AGO can be used to substitute SINCE and change PRESENT PERFECT into PAST SIMPLE the right auxiliary. Meaning I will substitute has it been for did. I don't have LONG; STARTED. Then STARTED becomes START as I will use SIMPLE PAST. Being that said, my new sentence will be: Are you ready? Are you really ready? Okay, I trust you. Here we go: The new sentence: How long ago did you start working here?* Did you get it right?

Unit 5 KWT examples

U5-LESSON 7

Unit 5 KWT examples

U5-LESSON 7

Unit 5 KWT examples

U5-LESSON 7

Now, at last:

U5-LESSON 7

U5-LESSON 7

U5-LESSON 7

U5-LESSON 7

U5-LESSON 7

U5-LESSON 7

U5-LESSON 7

U6 - LESSON 1

Learn how to use the prepositions by and with.
Lesson Excerpts

Using the Prepositions “By” & “With”

We use **by **to show how someone does something EXAMPLES: This bread was made by hand. I found a great little café near my office by accident. You can pay* by check or credit card. When we use by + a noun, we don’t use “a” or “the” before the noun EXAMPLES: This bread was made by hand. (Not, …made by a hand.) I found a great little café near my office by accident. (Not,…by the accident.) With the verb pay, we say pay by check and pay by credit card, but pay in cash. EXAMPLES: You can pay by check or credit card

LET'S PRACTICE THEN...

Shall we go on foot or .... car?

You may write ........ a pencil or a pen.

Send this letter ..... air mail.

I'm going to the cinema .... my friend.

I always go to school ...... Charles.

The key was lost .... my niece.

I cannot come ...... car. It is broken.

I got the stain out ...... this brush.

U6 - LESSON 2

Review active and passive voice.
Lesson Excerpts

ACTIVE VS PASSIVE VOICE

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ACTIVE AND PASSIVE? Active voice means that a sentence has a subject that acts upon its verb. Passive voice means that a subject is a recipient of a verb’s action.

A title slide

HOW DO WE FORM ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VOICE?

WHEN TO USE ACTIVE AND WHEN TO USE PASSIVE?

HOW TO CHANGE FROM ACTIVE TO PASSIVE?

PERSONAL AND IMPERSONAL PASSIVE

THE GET-PASSIVE

THE INFINITIVE PASSIVE VOICE

PASSIVE VOICE WITH GERUNDS

U6-LESSON 3

Learn about order of adjectives (OSASCOMUN/OSASCOMP)
Lesson Excerpts

HI EVERYONE!

LET'S WATCH A VIDEO SO WE CAN REMEMBER THE ACRONYM OSASCOMP AND PUT IT INTO CONTEXT

NOW, LET'S PRACTICE!

U6-LESSON 4

Learn about transition words
Lesson Excerpts

WELCOME BACK!

EXAMPLES OF TRANSITION WORDS

U6-LESSON 4

LET'S SEE HOW CAN WE USE THEM

EXAMPLES OF TRANSITION WORDS

U6-LESSON 4

LET'S PACTICE!

U6 - LESSON 5

- Review Relative pronouns and adverbs. - Review Relative clauses. - Differentiate essential and non-essential clauses.
Lesson Excerpts

In this lesson you will:

Ready for more?

Relative Clauses

Relative Clauses Relative clauses allow us to provide additional information without having to start a new sentence. In English, there are two types of relative clauses: defining relative clauses, used without commas, and non-defining clauses which are set off by commas. I like the person. The person was nice to me. I like the person who was nice to me. I hate the dog. The dog bit me. I hate the dog that bit me. I am moving to Louisville, KY. It is home to the Muhammad Ali Museum. I am moving to Louisville, KY, which is home to the Muhammad Ali Museum. Relative clauses give us more information about someone or something. We can use relative clauses to combine clauses without repeating information. The couple posted a Christmas present to their daughter, who lives in South Africa. The couple posted a Christmas present to their daughter. Their daughter lives in South Africa Using a relative clause means that there is no need to repeat ‘their daughter’. Types of relative clauses There are two types of relative clause: one type refers to a noun or noun phrase (these are defining and non-defining relative clauses) and the other type refers to a whole sentence or clause, especially in speaking. MORE EXAMPLES: These are my friends who I spend a lot of time with. The boy who is wearing glasses is Tony. Phil, who I met at summer camp, is very funny. I can still remember the day when I met him. We have a youth club in town where I often meet my friends. This is the reason why I go there. They often have a disco in the club, which is very popular. Linda, whose mother is a ballerina, can dance very well.

Defining and non-defining relative clauses Also called Essential and non-essential or restrictive and non-restrictive. Defining Relative Clauses Defining relative clauses are also known as identifying relative clauses or restrictive relative clauses in English, and are used without a comma. The relative clause is necessary, because it defines something more precisely. Example: The boy who is wearing glasses is Tony. Since there are two boys in the picture, we wouldn’t know which one was Tony if we didn’t have the relative clause. Non-Defining Relative Clauses Non-defining relative clauses are also known as non-identifying relative clauses or non-restrictive relative clauses in English, and are used with commas. The relative clause is not necessary, because even without the rit we would still understand who or what is being referred to. Example: Phil, who I met at summer camp, is very funny. A name is usually enough to identify a person, so the relative clause is not being used for purposes of identification, but merely to add some additional information about Phil. However, if both boys were called Phil, then we would need a defining relative clause to indicate which Phil we were talking about. When relative pronouns are used to add descriptive information, that information is either defining or non-defining. A defining clause - also known as a restrictive clause - gives essential information about the noun in question. It is so important that it cannot be cut out of the sentence and still convey the intended meaning. For example: This is the dog that was hit by a car. I don't like people who interrupt me. In both cases, the italicized clauses contain critical information. You can tell because if you cut out the clause, the sentence's meaning is fundamentally different. For example, saying "I don't like people" is very different from saying "I don't like people who interrupt me." Note that defining clauses require no additional punctuation. On the other hand, non-defining clauses add information that's nice to have but isn't essential to the sentence's overall meaning. They could be deleted and the sentence would convey basically the same information. For example: This painting, which I adore, is worth over a million dollars. The teacher, who was about to retire, began writing her memoirs. In both cases, you could cut out the non-defining clause and still understand the point of the sentence. The important part is that the paint is worth a million dollars; the fact that it is adored is merely nice to know. Note that non-defining clauses are set apart from the main sentence by commas, which help to indicate its less important status in the sentence.

U6 - LESSON 6

- Learn how to use phrasal verbs with go and give. - Learn idioms and fixed phrases related to a mixture of topics. - Learn key word transformation for this unit.
Lesson Excerpts

In this lesson you will:

Phrasal Verbs GO Let's see the ones within the unit 6 Go into (go into something) to start working in a particular type of job or business Alex has decided to go into nursing. Eric went into the army right after school. Go under if something such as a business goes under, it fails completely and stops operating Is the British film industry going under? There are many companies that went under during this pandemic

Phrasal Verbs GIVE Let's see the ones within the unit 6 Give out to give something to several people/distribute The office gives out financial advice to students. Politicians give out money during campaign. Give up to stop doing something that you do regularly His wife finally persuaded him to give up smoking. Giving up his job was the last thing we expected him to do. Give in (to) to stop competing or arguing and accept that you cannot win. The champion refused to give in and went on to win the set. give in to: The government has said all along that it will never give in to terrorist threats.

Let's now get into this:

to say something that is exactly right or completely true With regard to the gentleman’s comments, I think he has hit the nail right on the head.

U6 - LESSON 6

to damage or change (something) in a way that ruins it or prevents it from working properly We were going to renew our lease, but the landlord threw a wrench into the works by increasing the rent.

U6 - LESSON 6

to fail to understand each other; to be confused because each person has a different idea about what is happening or being said We got our wires crossed for a minute there—I thought you were asking me something else.

U6 - LESSON 6

to deliberately say something in order to make someone angry or upset I try not to get mad, but he knows exactly how to push all my buttons.

U6 - LESSON 6

to do something that prevents an activity from continuing, especially by no longer giving money to support it: If the viewing figures drop much more, the TV network will probably pull the plug on the whole series.

U6 - LESSON 6

to do something in a completely new way Voters are looking for a candidate who will break the mold and give them honest answers.

U6 - LESSON 6

Last but not least.

Please, show me some review teacher!

KWT Show me more Key Word Transformation In this unit you've learnt things about future, idioms about weather, phrasal verbs with call and check. Your TARGET language to transform sentences using KEY WORD TRANSFORMATION should be following one of those things or the vocabulary on it (see Quizlet for more info) Let's see it in context Imaging the given sentence is: How long has it been since you started working here? The given word is AGO The new incomplete sentence is: How ________ working here? Following the steps: 1- Confirm what is similar and cut it off. 2- Validate key word. 3- Understand the context. 4- Apply the missing sentence (3 to 6 words including the key word). 5- Recheck if everything is fine. ORIGINAL How long has it been since you started working here? KEY WORD AGO NEW SENTENCE How ________ working here? I have: How; working here. The given word AGO can be used to substitute SINCE and change PRESENT PERFECT into PAST SIMPLE the right auxiliary. Meaning I will substitute has it been for did. I don't have LONG; STARTED. Then STARTED becomes START as I will use SIMPLE PAST. Being that said, my new sentence will be: Are you ready? Are you really ready? Okay, I trust you. Here we go: The new sentence: How long ago did you start working here?* Did you get it right?

Unit 5 KWT examples

U6 - LESSON 6

Unit 5 KWT examples

U6 - LESSON 6

Unit 5 KWT examples

U6 - LESSON 6

U7-LESSON 1.1

REPORTED SPEECH - GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
Lesson Excerpts

REPORTED SPEECH

WHAT IS REPORTED SPEECH?

REPORTED AND REPORTING CLAUSES

REPORTING VERBS

U7 - LESSON 1.2

- Reported speech backshift
Lesson Excerpts

REPORTED SPEECH

WHAT IS REPORTED SPEECH?

BACKSHIFT IN REPORTED SPEECH

**BACKSHIFT ** We sometimes change the tense of the reported clause by moving it back one tense. For example, present simple goes back one tense to past simple. We call this change "BACKSHIFT".

NOW.....

U7-LESSON 1.3

Lesson Excerpts

REPORTED SPEECH

WHAT IS REPORTED SPEECH?

REPORTED STATEMENTS

Reported statements are one form of reported speech. DIRECT STATEMENT : He said, "I am sick." REPORTED STATEMENT : He said that he was sick.

U7 - LESSON 1.4

REPORTED QUESTIONS
Lesson Excerpts

REPORTED SPEECH

WHAT IS REPORTED SPEECH?

NOW YES....

We usually introduce reported questions with the verb "ask": He asked (me) if/whether... (YES/NO questions) He asked (me) why/when/where/what/how... (question-word questions)

REPORTING YES OR NO QUESTIONS

REPORTING WH-QUESTIONS

U7- LESSON 1.5

REPORTED REQUESTS
Lesson Excerpts

REPORTED REQUESTS

REPORTED SPEECH

WHAT IS REPORTED SPEECH?

NOW YES....

REPORTED REQUESTS

A request is when somebody asks you to do something – usually politely. Reported requests are one form of reported speech. DIRECT REQUEST: She said: "Could you open the window, please?" REPORTED REQUEST:She asked me to open the window.

U7 - LESSON 1.6

REPORTED ODERS
Lesson Excerpts

REPORTED ODERS

REPORTED SPEECH

WHAT IS REPORTED SPEECH?

NOW YES....

REPORTED ORDERS

U7-LESSON 2

VOCABULARY- IN THIS LESSON WE'LL LEARN ABOUT THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF STORES , GOODS AND FORMS OF PAYMENT.
Lesson Excerpts

ON THE MARKET!

LET'S GET STARTED!

LET'S SEE IF YOU PAID ATTENTION TO THAT VIDEO

WHAT CAN YOU BUY AT A FURNITURE STORE?

NOW THAT YOU'VE MASTERED THE FIRST PART OF THE LESSON, LET'S TALK ABOUT GOODS

YOU KNOW THE DRILL, LET'S PRACTICE!

LAST BUT NOT LEAST, WE NEED TO KNOW HOW TO PAY FOR THOSE GOODS AND SERVICES IN THOSE DIFFERENT STORES.

U7-LESSON 2

IT'S COMMON TO SEE SIGNS LIKE THIS AT THE STORES, INDICATING THE FORMS OF PAYMENT THEY ACCEPT. IN THIS CASE, ONLY CASH AND CREDIT CARDS ARE ACCEPTED. VISA, MASTERCARD, AMERICAN EXPRESS AND DISCOVER ARE CREDIT CARD NAMES.

U7-LESSON 2

IN THIS CASE, THIS STORE ACCEPTS MORE FORMS OF PAYMENT, AS YOU CAN SEE.

U7-LESSON 2

AS FOR THIS STORE, THEY HAVE A WIDER VARIETY OF FORMS OF PAYMENT. THEY'RE ACCEPTING ELECTRONIC FORMS OF PAYMENT, SUCH AS PAYPAL, PAYONEER, ETC.

U7-LESSON 2

U7-LESSON 3

IN THIS LESSON, YOU'LL REVIEW THE TYPES OF CLOTHES AND ACCESORIES.
Lesson Excerpts

TYPES OF CLOTHES AND ACCESORIES

LET'S SEE HOW CAN YOU DESCRIBE CLOTHES

LET'S PRACTICE!

U7-LESSON 4

CAUSATIVE FORM
Lesson Excerpts

HEY! IT'S GOOD TO SEE YOU BACK.

We use the causative form to say that we have arranged for someone to do something for us.

U7-LESSON  4

HOWEVER, WE NEED TO FOLLOW SOME RULES TO USE THIS CAUSATIVE FORM

NOW, LET'S PUT THAT INTO CONTEXT LITTLE BY LITTLE

IT'S IMPORTANT TO HIGHLIGHT THAT THE VERBS HAVE/GET CAN BE USED IN WHICHEVER TENSE. WHEN YOU USE THE TENSE THAT YOU NEED, YOU CAN USE THE TIME EXPRESSIONS OF THAT TENSE AS WELL.

U7-LESSON  4

U7-LESSON  4

LET'S PRACTICE !

EMME IS AT THE HAIRDRESSER AT THE MOMENT. SHE IS ___________ HER HAIR ___________.

GREAT JOB!

WE CAN ALSO MAKE QUESTIONS USING THE CAUSATIVE FORM. IN FACT, QUESTIONS ARE EASIER, BECAUSE WE ONLY NEED TO USE DO/DOES OR DID. AS YOU CAN SEE, WE CAN ALSO USE THE WH-QUESTION WORDS. NOTICE THAT NORMALLY THESE ARE YES/NO QUESTIONS, UNLESS YOU USE A WH-QUESTION WORD.

U7-LESSON  4

U7-LESSON  4

A LITTLE MORE PRACTICE NEVER KILLED NOBODY

DC4 2020 Course Author

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