Mental Health in the Workplace

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Mental Health in the Workplace Free

By EdApp
4 Lessons
4.6
(11 reviews)

This course aims to shed understanding on mental health issues, empower leaders & managers to spot the signs of mental health issues, know how to prevent & intervene when necessary and how to maintain a culture where employees with mental health issues are supported and are enabled to thrive and have flourishing careers.

Mental Health in the Workplace Lessons

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  1. Mental Health Issues
  2. Spotting the Signs
  3. Prevention & Intervention
  4. Building a Supportive Culture

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Mental Health in the Workplace course excerpts

Mental Health Issues

Mental Health in the Workplace Course - Lesson Excerpt

Mental Health in the Workplace

Mental Health Issues

Mental health and mental health-related symptoms are some of the most common reasons an employee may take time off from work. The effects of a mental health issue can keep productivity and revenue down in the workplace, as well as create unrest within the culture of the company.

Mental Health Issues

Mental illnesses are defined as health conditions that significantly impact a person’s mood, thinking, feelings, and behaviour. And though it may be hard to talk about for some, a lot of people worldwide actually experience symptoms (and side effects) related to mental health issues every year.

Mental Health Issues

Poor mental health is one of the biggest issues in the workplace today, this includes everything from the most commonly experienced symptoms of stress and anxiety, right through to more complex mental health conditions, such as depression, bipolar disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Mental Health Issues

If you see an employee's behaviour or performance changing over time, ask if he or she is OK. The role is not to diagnose but to express care and concern for another person. By doing so, you can make a positive difference, and checking in creates an organizational culture of caring.

Mental Health Issues

Which of these are the impacts of poor mental health?

Spotting the Signs

Mental Health in the Workplace Course - Lesson Excerpt

Spotting the Signs

Spotting the Signs

Mental health issues affect nearly 1 in 5 people at some point in their lifetime which means chances are good that someone in your workplace is affected by mental illness.

Spotting the Signs

Mental illness can have a big impact on our workplaces, but it isn’t always easy to recognise what it looks like. With the stigma surrounding mental illness, employees who are struggling may be reluctant to come forward

Spotting the Signs

Knowing the warning signs of common mental health conditions and connecting with care early leads to the best results. Yet, less than half of people experiencing mental health conditions get help.

Spotting the Signs

Untreated mental health conditions can be costly to employers in lost productivity, lower performance, loss of high performing employees, and rising disability rates.

Spotting the Signs

The more we know about the warning signs of common conditions in the workplace, like depression and anxiety, the more proactive we can be in supporting ourselves and others.

Spotting the Signs

Which of these are signs of poor mental health?

Prevention & Intervention

Mental Health in the Workplace Course - Lesson Excerpt

Prevention and Intervention

Prevention & Intervention

Prevention is safeguarding the mental health of your workforce, which you can do by creating an open and caring culture that makes staff feel supported and looked after.

Prevention & Intervention

Intervention is stepping in before problems become more serious. It’s taking simple steps to improve employee’s mental health when problems do occur, to prevent them from developing into something more serious.

Prevention & Intervention

An employee may not know that they have an issue with mental health or maybe scared to talk to their employer about it. Mental health can be a very personal and sensitive topic of conversation to have between employees, co-workers, and employers.

Prevention & Intervention

As a leader, you must have a plan not just for the benefit of the company, but for the employee as well. Mental health concerns are unlike other performance-related issues and therefore, the approach must be different and more empathetic.

Prevention & Intervention

It is important to remember that people suffering from a mental health issue don't have a choice not to feel this way and given the chance, would prefer that their mental health not affect their life negatively. Never discriminate against someone with a mental illness.

Prevention & Intervention

Protection Make sure your employee benefits package provides support for mental health. Make use of Occupational Health services, professional third parties and charities to address health problems and make any necessary adjustments in the workplace. Develop a tailored and phased return to work plan to help employees ease back into the workplace when they are ready. Hold consistent return to work interviews – these ensure the employee hasn’t come back too early and can help you get to the root of a problem, as well as being an effective tool of absence management. Continue to check-in with employees regularly – often support can drop off once they are settled back in the workplace, but it is important to have an ongoing, and meaningful dialogue to prevent problems from recurring.

Which of the following are the correct steps to protect and support your employee's recovery process?

Building a Supportive Culture

Mental Health in the Workplace Course - Lesson Excerpt

Building a Supportive Culture

Building a Supportive Culture

According to the Mental Health Foundation in the UK, 9 out of 10 people with mental health problems experience stigma and discrimination.

Building a Supportive Culture

Mental Health is still a taboo subject in the workplace. In a survey of adults, 56% said they would not hire someone with depression even if they were the best candidate for the job. 67% of employees feel scared, embarrassed or unable to talk about mental health concerns with their employer.

Building a Supportive Culture

To break this taboo and create an open, caring, and supportive culture, it’s important to get your board on the side and take a top-down approach. If leaders are speaking out on the issue, perhaps even drawing on their own experience, then this attitude will trickle down to managers and then staff.

Building a Supportive Culture

Addressing stigma and discrimination by building a supportive culture in the workplace is critical to ensuring that people can come forward and seek help.

Building a Supportive Culture

We all have a role to play in chipping away at the stigma and creating a workplace culture supportive of mental health so people are encouraged to seek help when it’s needed. Doing so has a high ROI, plus it's the right thing to do.

Building a Supportive Culture

Other Strategies to Support Mental Health in the Workplace Make mental health self-assessment tools available to all employees. Offer free or subsidized clinical screenings for depression from a qualified mental health professional, followed by directed feedback and clinical referral when appropriate. Offer health insurance with no or low out-of-pocket costs for depression medications and mental health counseling. Provide free or subsidized lifestyle coaching, counseling, or self-management programs. Distribute materials, such as brochures, fliers, and videos, to all employees about the signs and symptoms of poor mental health and opportunities for treatment. Host seminars or workshops that address depression and stress management techniques, like mindfulness, breathing exercises, and meditation. Create and maintain dedicated, quiet spaces for relaxation activities. Provide managers with training to help them recognize the signs and symptoms of stress and depression in team members and encourage them to seek help from qualified mental health professionals. Give employees opportunities to participate in decisions about issues that affect job stress.

Which of these are strategies are true about supporting mental health in the workplace?

Mental Health in the Workplace Course Author

EdAppEdApp is an award winning, mobile first microlearning platform with integrated authoring and delivery. EdApp contributes training courses that have been created by the in house instructional design specialists.

Its more important

Mental health is key in a work place

Very informative

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