Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals

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Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals

This course is about the Sustainable Development Goals and how they are linked with gender equality. It also explains the United Nation's Twin Track approach to addressing gender issues.

About the Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals course

This course is all about the Sustainable Development Goals and how they are linked to gender equality. Understanding the United Nation's Twin Track approach to addressing gender issues is essential for a valuable contribution to tackling gender inequality globally. This multi-part course is suited to everyone.

4.5(10)

What you will learn

  • Snapshot of Gender Issues
  • Bangladesh Case Study
  • Twin Track Approach

Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals course content

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Learn about how gender issues interact with the Sustainable Development Goals. This lesson examines the relationship between gender and the first ten of the goals.
Lesson Excerpts

** Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals** Snapshot of gender issues across the SDGs

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Gender equality is set out as a fundamental value of the SDG's.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

“We resolve, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and among countries; to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies; to protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources.” Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Declaration, Intro, Paragraph 3

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Before we look at the Sustainable Development Goals in more detail, consider what Empowerment means to you.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere More women than men live in poverty, especially during their peak childbearing years. Ensuring women’s access to basic services, control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services is key to achieving SDG 1.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture Unequal power relations in households render women more vulnerable to food insecurity. Legal reform for more equitable (re)distribution of assets, such as land and credit, and enforcing decent work and income for women in food production are necessary to achieve SDG 2.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages Societies should end practices that critically endanger women’s health and well-being. Governments should adopt pro-active legislations, and improve the provision of health services, especially for the poorest and survivors of violence. Access to skilled birth attendance is also a must.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all An estimated 15 million girls versus 10 million boys remain out of primary school, and higher numbers of girls drop out of secondary school for reasons including early pregnancy and the expectation that they should contribute to household work.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Goal 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

One in five women and girls aged 15 to 49 have experienced physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner in the past 12 months.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Women spend three times more unpaid care work on average than men.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 1-10

Which actions are necessary to improve unequal power relations in households, and therefore make women less vulnerable to food insecurity?

Which of these gender issues relate to SDG 6 (Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all)?

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Learn about how gender issues interact with the Sustainable Development Goals. This lesson examines the relationship between gender and the last seven of the goals.
Lesson Excerpts

** Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals** Snapshot of gender issues across the SDGs

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Test your Knowledge In a sample of 141 countries over the period of 1981 to 2002, within societies with higher gender inequalities, it was found that natural disasters (and subsequent impacts) on average...

This lesson will cover Sustainable Development Goals 11-17.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Why is tackling climate change an important aspect of gender equality? Select all that apply

Goal 15: Stop degradation, we must preserve forest, desert and mountain ecosystems Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reserve land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Women, particularly those who are poor and living in rural areas, often depend on forests for fuel, fodder and food. Deforestation means spending many more hours each day walking long distances to secure these needs.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Their limited ownership of land reduces their capacity to adapt to losses or to make decisions about how land is used. While some have extensive knowledge about traditional practices that are inherently sustainable, this is often excluded from decisions about sustainable ecosystems.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Why is Goal 16 important? Select all that apply

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Goal 17: Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Achieving the SDGs for women and girls requires an enabling environment and a stronger commitment to partnership and cooperation. Increased mobilisation of financial resources for gender equality is urgently needed.

Snapshot of Gender Issues - SDGs 11-17

Twin Track Approach

Learn about the United Nation's Twin Track approach to addressing gender equality.
Lesson Excerpts

** Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals** Twin Track Approach

Twin Track Approach

Numerous studies and pieces of evidence from the past have shown that gender equality stimulates growth, generates employment and enhances human capital.

Twin Track Approach

It is integral to achieving a wide range of development objectives, from poverty reduction to health and sanitation, food security and environmental sustainability, mitigation and adaptation to climate change and disaster risk reduction, and peaceful and inclusive societies.

Twin Track Approach

Gender equality also makes significant contributions to the future, as women’s increased access to income and resources often bring greater health and education outcomes for their children, especially girls.

Twin Track Approach

It is under this global understanding that gender equality is positioned as a pre-condition and accelerator for sustaining development and the achievement of all SDGs.

Twin Track Approach

In order to make sure no one is ‘left behind,’ SDGs takes a Twin Track Approach by having a stand-alone goal on gender, SDG 5 “Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls,” and 45 targets & 53 indicators that are gender-specific & mainstreamed across the SDGs.

Twin Track Approach

The Twin Track Approach aims to identify not only who is ‘left behind’ but also ‘how’ and in ‘which ways’ marginalisation and exclusion are experienced.

Twin Track Approach

Differences related to wealth, location and ethnicity, for example, combine to create deep pockets of deprivation across a range of SDGs, from access to education (SDG4) and health care (SDG3) to clean water (SDG6) and decent work (SDG8).

Twin Track Approach

In order to tackle these issues, SDG 5 addresses the root causes of discrimination that curtail women and girls’ rights in private and public spheres. SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls Let's look at the targets for SDG5...

Twin Track Approach

5.1 End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere

Twin Track Approach

5.2 Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation

Twin Track Approach

5.3 Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation

Twin Track Approach

5.4 Recognise and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate

Twin Track Approach

5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic, and public life

Twin Track Approach

5.6 Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform For Action and the outcome documents of their review conference

Twin Track Approach

5.a Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws

Twin Track Approach

5.b Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women

Twin Track Approach

5.c Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels

Twin Track Approach

Other targets and indicators that are gender mainstreamed serve to avoid gender blind interventions that not only ‘leave’ women and girls behind, but also deepen existing gender gaps and discriminations.

Twin Track Approach

Indicators that call for sex-disaggregated data leads to more adequate and evidence-based interventions, as baseline data are set and gender needs are more likely to be addressed.

Twin Track Approach

Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all Swipe across to learn about the 8 gender specific indicators

Twin Track Approach

4.1.1 Minimum proficiency in reading and mathematics at the end of primary and lower secondary, by sex

Twin Track Approach

4.2.1 Early childhood development, by sex 4.2.2 Pre-primary participation, by sex

Twin Track Approach

4.3.1 Participation of youth and adults in education, by sex

Twin Track Approach

4.5.1 Parity indices for all education indicators

Twin Track Approach

4.6.1 Proficiency (at a given age group) in functional literacy and numeracy skills, by sex

Twin Track Approach

4.7.1 Mainstreaming of global citizenship education, gender equality and human rights

Twin Track Approach

4.a.1 Upgrade education facilities with hand washing and single-sex sanitation facilities

Twin Track Approach

What's the definition of Gender Analysis?

Bangladesh Case Study

Learn more about the Twin Track Approach by relating it to an example case study.
Lesson Excerpts

** Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals** Bangladesh Case Study

Bangladesh Case Study

Let's look at the following case study and examine how it utilised the Twin Track Approach. On the following slides is a brief explanation of the situation and key strategies which were applied.

Bangladesh Case Study

A case study from Bangladesh Action Against Hunger (ACF) implemented a Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) pilot project in ten remote villages, targeting over 4,000 households, mostly female-headed households and poor women’s households highly exposed to disaster risks.

Bangladesh Case Study

When a tropical storm struck, shortly after the end of the project, the women put in practice the disaster preparedness measures that were explained to them. They protected their lives and livelihoods, on their own initiative, without the intervention of the national disaster management system. There were three key project strategies, as follows...

Bangladesh Case Study

Strategy 1 In each village, the project established both a Village Disaster Management Committee (VDMCs) and a Women’s Committee (WCs) through a gender-inclusive community-led approach.

Bangladesh Case Study

Strategy 2 The project promoted gender equality and the importance of women’s participation in Disaster Risk Reduction practices, to enhance disaster resilience among vulnerable communities. It addressed gender specific issues that lead to women’s vulnerability, such as violence, sexual harassment and limited access to recover support. Women received capability building on early warning, nutrition for pregnant and lactating women, and adolescent girls’ reproductive health problems.

Bangladesh Case Study

Strategy 3 The project provided direct livelihood support to female-headed households and women’s households living outside an embankment located in the project area. This helped them improve their incomes and food security.

Bangladesh Case Study

Let's see how the SDG's Twin Track Approach was applied to this project...

Bangladesh Case Study

First and foremost, the project was a disaster risk management project. This means that it involved GOAL 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.

Bangladesh Case Study

At the same time, the project put strong emphasis on gender inclusive decision-making, which is key in advancing gender equality. This intention strongly relates to SDG 5, ** Achieve gender equality and promote all women and girls**. Particularly important is Target 5.5, which is 'Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life'. During this project, Village Disaster Management Committees were composed of men only. Therefore, to establish the Women's Committees and position them as catalysts to raise and address gender issues shows the strong commitment of the project to make the project intervention inclusive and gender responsive. At first, women were difficult to mobilise due to cultural norms and practices. They had inadequate access to economic opportunities, low education, and low status within the community’s decision-making forums. Women's Committees gave women the space to discuss gender issues; meetings were organised at conducive hours for women, and slowly women began to participate in previously male-dominated discussions.

It was initially difficult to mobilise the women into participation in Women's Committees due to cultural norms and practices such as...

*Target 5.2 * Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.

Bangladesh Case Study

Target 5.6 Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences.

Bangladesh Case Study

The Women's Committees raised community awareness on gender specific vulnerabilities in disaster. It also played a vital role in disseminating information, including early warning messages being shared by WC members.

Bangladesh Case Study

Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals Course Author

UNITARThe United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) is a dedicated training arm of the United Nations system.

Users Also Learned

I have learned the role women play in society and for the attainment of the SDGs agenda, what needs to be done for women to participate. Eg equality in home, workforce, parliament representation.

Learnt a lot about how important gender is in relation to the SDGs

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