Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness)

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Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) Free

By EdApp
5 Lessons
4.4
(5 reviews)

In this course, you will learn about food poisoning, its types and causes, and the steps you must take in order to prevent foodborne illnesses.

Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) Lessons

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  1. What is Food Poisoning?
  2. Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins
  3. How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality
  4. Quiz
  5. Sources

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Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) course excerpts

What is Food Poisoning?

This introductory lesson talks about food poisoning including its symptoms, types, and common causes.
Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) Course - Lesson Excerpt

What is Food Poisoning? This lesson defines Food Poisoning, and talks about the common causes and symptoms.

Food poisoning occurs when a person swallows food or drink that contains harmful bacteria, toxins, or viruses.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), annual figures show that over 600 million people suffer from food poisoning and an estimated 420,000 cases result in death.

What is Food Poisoning?

Over 200 types of diseases may be contracted via food poisoning; ranging from the common diarrhoea to certain types of cancer.

What is Food Poisoning?

In spite of the alarming reality, food poisoning remains preventable. Proper handling, storing, and preparation of food greatly reduces the risk of contamination.

What is Food Poisoning?

What are the main factors which influence a person's susceptibility to food poisoning? Select all correct answers.

Symptoms of Food Poisoning The severity of food poisoning symptoms may vary depending on the type of germ or toxin swallowed. Below are some of the most common symptoms of food poisoning to look out for with our customers: Upset stomach Stomach cramps Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Fever

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

This lesson explains the difference between different foodborne pathogens, particularly in regard to their common food vehicles and typical symptoms.
Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) Course - Lesson Excerpt

When someone becomes sick from food, this illness is commonly caused by... Bacteria, Viruses or Toxins Some of these pathogens can also be transferred from person-to-person or through contaminated surfaces, but the symptoms will be the same regardless if food is involved. For each foodborne illness discussed in this lesson, we will cover... Typical symptoms Typical food vehicles (i.e. what type of food causes the illness)

Viruses

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

How do Viruses make you sick? Viruses are parasites that require a host in order to survive. They cause diseases by latching on to the cells of a host and hacking the cellular programming to create copies of itself. When a virus reproduces faster than your immune system can control it, it begins to harm your body by destroying healthy cells. Examples of viral foodborne illnesses include....

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

Norovirus Foods Poorly cooked shellfish, ready-to-eat foods touched by an infected worker. Symptoms Abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, headaches, diarrhea.

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

Hepatitis A Foods Raw or poorly cooked seafood which has been harvested from contaminated waters, or ready-to-eat foods which have been handled by an infected food handler. Symptoms Jaundice, fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite and low-grade fever.

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

Bacteria

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

How does Bacteria make you sick? Bacteria, unlike viruses, do not need a host in order to survive and can reproduce on their own. While most bacteria are harmless, and some actually help gut health by aiding in digestion, some disease-causing variants produce toxins that harm your body's cells, similar to how viral infections manifest through illness. Examples of bacterial foodborne illnesses include....

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

Salmonella Foods Products of animal origin such as undercooked poultry, raw egg desserts and mayonnaise. Symptoms Headaches, fever, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, vomiting and nausea.

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

Campylobacter ** Foods** Unpasteurized milk, raw and undercooked poultry and contaminated drinking water. Symptoms Fever, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), nausea and abdominal cramps.

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

**Escherichia coli (E.coli) ** Symptoms Diarrhea (often bloody) and abdominal cramps. Foods Unpasteurized milk and juice, undercooked meat, sprouts, contaminated water and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) Foods Unpasteurized milk, soft cheeses, ready-to-eat deli meats. Symptoms Meningitis, sepsis, fever, aches and pains. Listeria can be fatal for infants, children and the elderly.

Viruses, Bacteria and Toxins

What factors influence the growth of bacteria? Select all correct answers.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

In this lesson, we will cover food safety practices that lower the risk of food poisoning including proper food storage, kitchen hygiene, cooking procedures, and packing.
Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) Course - Lesson Excerpt

How do you prevent Food Poisoning?

Catching a foodborne illness is one of the worst things a customer can experience.

While food poisoning symptoms may vary from mild inconvenience to requiring immediate medical attention, customer experience suffers all the same.

Fortunately, there are numerous ways to protect our customers from food poisoning.

Step 1 Raw Food Storage

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Fridge temperatures must be kept at 5°C (41°F) at all times. This slows the growth of harmful germs which can contaminate raw food; potentially leading to food poisoning.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

No two kinds of fruits and vegetables should be submerged in the same water as this could lead to cross contamination.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Raw food products delivered by suppliers must be immediately refrigerated. Raw foods that sit above 5°C (41°F) for more than 2 hours should not be consumed and must be disposed of immediately.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Step 2 Kitchen Hygiene

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Before preparing food, you must wash your hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds. You must also do this in between food preparation steps if you've handled uncooked eggs, raw meat, poultry, fish, and their juices.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Wash your hands in the same manner after sneezing, blowing your nose, coughing, sneezing, and after using the bathroom.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

If you have abrasions, infections, or any kind of wounds on your hands, use clean disposable gloves. You must wash your hands even if you're wearing gloves.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Cleanliness and Hygiene for Kitchen Surfaces, Platters, and Utensils Wash with hot, soapy water, all surfaces used in the preparation of raw meat, fish, poultry, and eggs before proceeding to the next step in food preparation. Faucets, counter tops, and cutting boards must also be washed with hot soapy water. After rinsing, you can air or pat dry with disposable paper towels. Cutting boards can also be sanitized with a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of water. Flood the surface with the solution and allow it to stand for several minutes before rinsing, then air or pat drying with disposable paper towels. Never use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked products since bacteria from raw meats can potentially transfer to the cooked dish. Food thermometers must be washed with hot, soapy water after each use to prevent potential cross contamination.

Step 3 Cooking Procedure

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Before cooking anything, ensure that you... DO NOT use foods that have an unusual odor or appearance. DO NOT use expired foods DO NOT use foods that came in damaged packaging DO NOT wash raw poultry and meat as this could spread harmful bacteria to other foods, utensils, and surfaces. Cooking meat at the recommended internal temperatures is enough to kill harmful pathogens without risking cross contamination.

YOU SHOULD Use a thermometer when cooking to ensure that different types of meats are cooked in their recommended temperature to kill harmful bacteria.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Beef and pork should be cooked to at least 71°C (160°F) Poultry should be cooked to at least 73.8°C (165°F) Fish should be cooked to at least 62.7°C (145°F)

Remember.. Always use a fresh plate to serve the cooked dish.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Step 4 Storing Cooked Foods

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

When storing foods, raw food must be stored at the bottom of the fridge. This avoids its juices from dripping onto cooked food and potentially contaminating it.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Prior to refrigeration, cooked foods must be allowed to cool to room temperature within 2 hours after they're taken off the stove. This prevents the refrigerator's temperature from rising which could trigger bacterial growth in other stored foods.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Cover all food with lids, tin foil or plastic wrap. Again, ensure that the fridge is set to 5°C (41°F), while the freezer is set below -15°C (5°F) before storing food.

How to Prevent Food Poisoning in Hospitality

Quiz

How much do you remember from this course? Time to test your knowledge of food poisioning.
Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) Course - Lesson Excerpt

What are the main factors which influence a person's susceptibility to food poisoning? Select all correct answers.

What factors influence the growth of bacteria? Select all correct answers.

Food Poisoning (Food-borne Illness) Course Author

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