Basic Rigging

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Basic Rigging Free

By EdApp
5 Lessons
4.0
(2 reviews)

Learn how to choose the right lifting accessories, hitch types and how to communicating with crane operators.

Basic Rigging Lessons

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  1. Introduction
  2. Choosing the right lifting accessory
  3. Hitch Types & Terminology
  4. Communicating with Crane Operators
  5. Resources

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Basic Rigging course excerpts

Introduction

Basic Rigging Course - Lesson Excerpt

Introduction to Rigging Rigging covers the moving, placing or securing of a load using mechanical load shifting equipment.

Introduction

It's commonly used industries such as construction, shipping, entertainment, logging yards and manufacturing plants.

Introduction

According to OSHA, qualified riggers are required in which of the following circumstances? Select all that apply

General Safety General common sense and safety rules apply: Keep your hands, fingers and feet clear of pinch points Be aware of stacked materials that can potentially be knocked over with a swinging load Ensure you have a designated spotter to help you check that proper clearances are maintained Warn near by workers before beginning each raising, lowering or swinging task Make sure proper blockades are in to remind non authorised rigging personnel to stay clear Wear the correct PPE such as a hard had, glasses, gloves and steel capped boots.

Choosing the right lifting accessory

Basic Rigging Course - Lesson Excerpt

Check shackles before each use! Here are the things you should look out for: ✅ All marking are legible ✅ Threads of the pin and the body are undamaged ✅ Body is in good condition – not distorted or unduly ✅ Free from nicks, gouges, cracks and corrosion Most importantly, never try to modify, repair or reshape a shackle by welding, heating or bending as this will affect the Working Load Limit (WLL). Any defective equipment should be removed from service.2

In general all slings must have the correct usage information affixed to it, such as load capacity and load temperatures, as some sling materials may stretch or melt under extreme heat. See image above for an example of information that typically appears on the label, such as the WLL, WLL in different holding positions, material, warnings.

Choosing the right lifting accessory

Chains Best used for your heaviest load and high temperature environments, as it's least likely to be damaged by heat when compared to the other types of slings. Always inspect it for cuts or worn links before each use.

Choosing the right lifting accessory

Wire rope Most common sling used across many industries. These should always be inspected for worn out, broken wires, kinks, and the end connection must be secure.

Choosing the right lifting accessory

Synthetic fabrics These are generally the most flexible type of sling, as it protects the load from abrasion. Since it's lightweight it also reduces worker fatigue and stress, since it's much lighter weight than the other sling types.

Choosing the right lifting accessory

Metal mesh Generally these slings are wide and flat so it makes easier to balance a load. Most suited to lifting things with sharp edges as the mesh component protects are the integrity of the sling.

Choosing the right lifting accessory

Hitch Types & Terminology

Basic Rigging Course - Lesson Excerpt

Hitch Types This lesson covers the different ways slings can be used to securely hold onto the items being moved. The decision to choose the right type of hitch should be made with your crane operator.

Hitch Types & Terminology

Choke Hitch The sling is wrapped around the item and is secured back onto itself, thus creating a circular shape much like a collar around a dog. When the sling is pulled tightly the tension keeps the item in place. This method works particularly well with wide loads.

Hitch Types & Terminology

Double Wrap (a.k.a Double Choke) The sling is wrapped around the load twice before being secured in place. It's usually applied to flat loads.

Hitch Types & Terminology

⚠️ Safety Precautions ⚠️ Best method to use on anything that has an angle or anything vertical as it'll stop it from slipping. Make sure the slings do not over lap at the bottom of the load.

Hitch Types & Terminology

Which of the following images demonstrates a choke hitch? In a choke hitch the sling wraps around the load, much like a dog's collar and leash.

Hitch Types & Terminology

Which of the following images demonstrates a choke hitch? In a choke hitch the sling wraps around the load, much like a dog's collar and leash.

Hitch Types & Terminology

Which of the following images demonstrates a choke hitch? In a choke hitch the sling wraps around the load, much like a dog's collar and leash.

Hitch Types & Terminology

Which hitch is are banned in some countries?

Communicating with Crane Operators

Basic Rigging Course - Lesson Excerpt

Communicating with Crane Operators

Communicating with Crane Operators

Centring the load The hook and wires run vertically to the centre the load's centre of gravity. Riggers are responsible for telling the operator when they're at the centre of the load. Once you notify the crane driver they'll be able to proceed with lifting the load. Let's see what happens when a load is under or over jibbed in the next slide...

Communicating with Crane Operators

Working with Boom Cranes There are two special signals that are used in conjunction with boom cranes, for when you want to raise or lower the boom.

Communicating with Crane Operators

Boom Down When you want the boom lowered extend your arm, close your fist and point your thumb down.

Communicating with Crane Operators

Boom Up When you want the boom raised extend your arm, close your fist and point your thumb up.

Communicating with Crane Operators

In what scenario would you use this signal?

Communicating with Crane Operators

Which signal would you make for an emergency stop? In an emergency you would indicate to your crane driver by extending both arms horizontally outwards, and then inwards towards your chest.

Communicating with Crane Operators

Which signal would you make for an emergency stop? In an emergency you would indicate to your crane driver by extending both arms horizontally outwards, and then inwards towards your chest.

Communicating with Crane Operators

Which signal would you make for an emergency stop? In an emergency you would indicate to your crane driver by extending both arms horizontally outwards, and then inwards towards your chest.

Communicating with Crane Operators

Which signal would you make for an emergency stop? In an emergency you would indicate to your crane driver by extending both arms horizontally outwards, and then inwards towards your chest.

Communicating with Crane Operators

Basic Rigging Course Author

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